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Australia borders to open to 200,000 visa holders including skilled migrants and international students

Fully vaccinated eligible visa holders can come to Australia without needing to apply for a travel exemption from December 1.

The move opens the door for tourists, backpackers, skilled migrants and international students to fly in for summer.

Japanese and Korean citizens who have been double-jabbed can also visit Australia from the same date without needing to quarantine, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced today.
A plane takes off from a rural Australian airport.
A plane takes off from a rural Australian airport. (AFR)

Anyone hoping to visit Australia must be fully vaccinated and return a negative PCR test within three days of departing for Australia.

Because of the different rules in each state and territory, only New South Wales, Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory will allow travellers to fly in without quarantining.

Australia’s safe travel bubble with Singapore opened yesterday.

Mr Morrison said the return of skilled workers and students to Australia is “a major milestone”.

He also claimed Australians could look forward to the Christmas and holiday season in a way that “few around the world can”.

Earlier, speaking on Today, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said reopening borders to 200,000 visa holders would be a real boost to Australia’s economy.

Employers have complained of a shortfall in workers across a variety of sectors after Australia locked out the world for 18 months, when the pandemic began in early 2020.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the return of skilled workers and international students to Australia will further boost Australia's economic recovery.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the return of skilled workers and international students to Australia will further boost Australia’s economic recovery. (9News)

Yesterday, Australia ticked past the key milestone of 85 per cent double vaccinated for adults aged over 16, triggering the final phase of its reopening strategy.

According to Australian Bureau of Statistics figures, international education contributed a whopping $37.6 billion to the Australian economy in 2019.

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